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[:en]Noam Chomsky: Brazil’s President Dilma Rousseff “Impeached by a Gang of Thieves”

Por Redação

17 de maio de 2016 : 16h33

[:en]

on Democracy Now

As protests continue in Brazil over the Legislature’s vote to suspend President Dilma Rousseff and put her on trial, Noam Chomsky notes that “we have the one leading politician who hasn’t stolen to enrich herself, who’s being impeached by a gang of thieves, who have done so. That does count as a kind of soft coup.” Rousseff’s replacement, Brazil’s former vice president, Michel Temer, is a member of the opposition PMDBparty who is implicated in Brazil’s massive corruption scandal involving state-owned oil company Petrobras, and has now appointed an all-white male Cabinet charged with implementing corporate-friendly policies.


TRANSCRIPT

This is a rush transcript. Copy may not be in its final form.

AMY GOODMAN: What about what’s happening right now in Brazil, where protests are continuing over the Legislature’s vote to suspend President Dilma Rousseff and put her on trial? Now El Salvador has refused to recognize the new Brazilian government. The Brazilian—the Salvadoran president, Cerén, said Rousseff’s ouster had, quote, “the appearance of a coup d’état.” What’s happening there? And what about the difference between—it looked like perhaps Bush saved Latin America simply by not focusing on it, totally wrapped up in Iraq and Afghanistan. It looks like the Obama administration is paying a bit more attention.

NOAM CHOMSKY: Well, I don’t think it’s just a matter of not paying attention. Latin America has, to a significant extent, liberated itself from foreign—meaning mostly U.S.—domination in the past 10 or 15 years. That’s a dramatic development in world affairs. It’s the first time in 500 years. It’s a big change. So the so-called lack of attention is partly the fact that the U.S. is kind of being driven out of the hemisphere, less that it can do. It used to be able to overthrow governments, carry out coups at will and so on. It tries. There have been three—maybe it depends how you count them—coups, coup attempts this century. One in Venezuela in 2002 succeeded for a couple of days, backed by the U.S., overthrown by popular reaction. A second in Haiti, 2004, succeeded. The U.S. and France—Canada helped—kidnapped the president, sent him off to Central Africa, won’t permit his party to run in elections. That was a successful coup. Honduras, under Obama, there was a military coup, overthrew a reformist president. The United States was almost alone in pretty much legitimizing the coup, you know, claiming that the elections under the coup regime were legitimate. Honduras, always a very poor, repressed society, became a total horror chamber. Huge flow of refugees, we throw them back in the border, back to the violence, which we helped create. Paraguay, there was a kind of a semi-coup. What’s happening—also to get rid of a progressive priest who was running the country briefly.

What’s happening in Brazil now is extremely unfortunate in many ways. First of all, there has been a massive level of corruption. Regrettably, the Workers’ Party, Lula’s party, which had a real opportunity to achieve something extremely significant, and did make some considerable positive changes, nevertheless joined the rest—the traditional elite in just wholesale robbery. And that should—that should be punished. On the other hand, what’s happening now, what you quoted from El Salvador, I think, is pretty accurate. It’s a kind of a soft coup. The elite detested the Workers’ Party and is using this opportunity to get rid of the party that won the elections. They’re not waiting for the elections, which they’d probably lose, but they want to get rid of it, exploiting an economic recession, which is serious, and the massive corruption that’s been exposed. But as even The New York Times pointed out, Dilma Rousseff is maybe the one politician who hasn’t—leading politician who hasn’t stolen in order to benefit herself. She’s being charged with manipulations in the budget, which are pretty standard in many countries, taking from one pocket and putting it into another. Maybe it’s a misdeed of some kind, but certainly doesn’t justify impeachment. In fact, she’s—we have the one leading politician who hasn’t stolen to enrich herself, who’s being impeached by a gang of thieves, who have done so. That does count as a kind of soft coup. I think that’s correct.

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Daniel

18 de maio de 2016 às 09h58

I read this comment today in The Guardian.
“What The Guardian should do, investigate the Brazilian media that has planned every single step of this coup. There will be enough evidence to prove it. What we need is an investigation by the serious and plural newspapers of the democratic world such as The Guardian, Le Monde, NYT and other responsible journalism to inform the world. This is very serious. It will have dangerous consequences for the future, not only for Brazil, but for humanity, taking into considerations the violation of human rights. Please investigate this tirelessly for the sake of millions in Brazil that in 2014 were removed from UN World Hunger Map. I live in a civilized, democratic and diverse society and I know the value of freedom. Millions in Brazil went out of poverty in the last 12 years and they will be the first ones to pay for this tragedy. The Brazilian media behind the coup is the same that supported the military regime for over 20 years. In December 2014, Brazil’s National Truth Commission released a nearly 2,000-page report detailing government-approved political killings, torture and crimes against humanity, and calling for the perpetrators to be prosecuted. The same media today has not changed, they participate during the dark period of Brazil’s history and again they are the main actors and the catalyst for this coup against democracy. The Brazilian oligarchy don’t like democracy and they don’t like their poor and marginalised brothers and sisters. It’s a selfish and racist oligarchy. I plead to the serious journalism, take another step and depict the Brazilian media. They lie, they promoted haterism, they act as a political party and they make unwarranted assumptions. Please show you care for the truth and for a better world.”

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